view cart menu separator categories menu separator faq
advanced search
categories  > my ebay (2819)
THREE STOOGES in ORBIT Original BELGIUM Poster LARRY Moe CURLY 3 SCI-FI Columbia
2 images
 
THREE STOOGES in ORBIT Original BELGIUM Poster LARRY Moe CURLY 3 SCI-FI Columbia
THREE STOOGES in ORBIT Original BELGIUM Poster LARRY Moe CURLY 3 SCI-FI Columbia

THREE STOOGES in ORBIT Original BELGIUM Poster LARRY Moe CURLY 3 SCI-FI Columbia

Price: $49.99 add to cart     
Feedback: 92.34%, 183 sales Ask seller a question
Shipping: US-Mainland: $6.95 (more destinations)
Condition: Used
Payment Options: Money Order, Cashier's Check, Cash On delivery, Personal Check,
This is an ORIGINAL Belgium Poster, measuring 14” x 19-1/2” with the ORIGINAL Bruxelles information on the bottom. It also has side ding side. It has a fold in the middle and features great artwork of LARRY, MOE and CURLY. IT IS OVER 50 YEARS OLD!!This poster was to promote the classic1962 Comedy Sci-Fi film,The Three Stooges in OrbitThe Stooges must battle alien spies to safeguard a goofy scientist's revolutionary new vehicle. The Three Stooges have a show to do, but since the rehearsals require cooking, they manage to get themselves thrown out of every hotel they can find. They finally find room and board at the home of the goofy inventor, Professor Danforth, but that home has it's own problems. Namely, the Professor is working on a new all-terrain, flying, space worthy submersible. With some persuading, the Stooges agree to help him finish his invention and demonstrate it to the military. However, the Martians are interested in the vechile as well and when they learn of its perfection, they plan to steal it and destroy the Earth. Like it or not, the fate of the world rests on the courage of Moe, Larry and Curly-Joe. Director:Edward Bernds Writers:Norman Maurer (story), Elwood Ullman Stars: Larry Fine, Moe Howard, Joe DeRitaCast Joe DeRita ... Curly-Joe (as The Three Stooges) Larry Fine ... Larry (as The Three Stooges) Moe Howard ... Moe (as The Three Stooges) Carol Christensen ... Carol Danforth Edson Stroll ... Captain Tom Andrews Emil Sitka ... Professor Danforth George N. Neise ... Ogg / Airline Pilot Rayford Barnes ... Zogg / Airline Co-Pilot Norman Leavitt ... Williams Nestor Paiva ... Chairman Don Lamond ... Colonel Smithers Peter Brocco ... Doctor Appleby Thomas Glynn ... George Galveston Jean Charney ... WAF Sergeant Peter Dawson ... General Bixby Graphics are still colorful except for theedge wear. Framed would look amazing . Great for the foreign movie poster collector or fans of the 3 Stooges. Shop with confidence! This is part of our in-store inventory from our shop which is has been located in the heart of Hollywood where we have been in business for OVER40 years! MORE INFO ON THE THREE STOOGES: The Three Stooges were an American vaudeville and comedy act of the mid–20th century (1930–1975) best known for their numerous short subject films, still syndicated to television. Their hallmark was physical farce and slapstick. In films, the Stooges were commonly known by their first names: "Moe, Larry, and Curly" or "Moe, Larry, and Shemp", among other lineups depending on the films; there were six active stooges, five of which performed in the shorts. Moe and Larry were always present until the very last years of the ensemble's forty-plus-year run.The act began as part of a late-twenties vaudeville comedy act, billed as Ted Healy and his Stooges, consisting of Healy, Moe Howard, his brother Shemp Howard, and Larry Fine. The four made one feature film entitled Soup to Nuts before Shemp left to pursue a solo career. He was replaced by his younger brother Jerome (Curly Howard), and the trio eventually left Healy to launch their own act, billed as The Three Stooges.Curly suffered a debilitating stroke in May 1946, and Shemp returned, reinstating the original lineup until Shemp's death in November 1955. Film actor Joe Palma was used as a temporary stand-in; the maneuver thereafter became known as the term of art Fake Shemp—to complete four Shemp-era shorts under contract. The coining of the term took place before a new contract from Columbia but after comic Joe Besser joined as the third Stooge in a run in '56–57—but he left in 1958 to nurse his ailing spouse. Columbia terminated its shorts division and released its Stooges contractual rights to the Screen Gems production studio. When Screen Gems syndicated the shorts to television, the Stooges became one of the most popular comedy act of the early 1960s. They also made a cameo appearance in the 1963 comedy classic It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.Comic actor Joe DeRita became "Curly Joe" in 1958, replacing Besser. With the television exposure, the act regained momentum throughout the 1960s as popular kiddie fare until Larry Fine's paralyzing stroke in January 1970. Fine died in 1975 after a further series of strokes. Moe tried one final time to revive the Stooges with longtime supporting actor Emil Sitka in Larry's role but this attempt was cut short with Moe's death in May 1975.The Three Stooges started in 1925 as part of a raucous vaudeville act called "Ted Healy and His Stooges" (also known as "Ted Healy and His Southern Gentlemen", "Ted Healy and His Three Lost Souls", and "Ted Healy and His Racketeers"). The moniker "Three Stooges" was never used during their tenure with Healy. Moe (Moses Harry Horwitz) joined Healy's act in 1921, and his brother Shemp came aboard in 1923. In 1925 violinist-comedian Larry Fine and xylophonist-comedian Fred Sanborn, also joined the group. In the act, lead comedian Healy would attempt to sing or tell jokes while his noisy assistants would keep "interrupting" him, causing Healy to retaliate with verbal and physical abuse.In 1930, Ted Healy and His Stooges (including Sanborn) appeared in their first Hollywood feature film, Soup to Nuts, released by Fox Film Corporation. The film was not a critical success, but the Stooges' performances were singled out as memorable, leading Fox to offer the trio a contract minus Healy. This enraged Healy, who told studio executives that the Stooges were his employees. The offer was withdrawn, and after Howard, Fine and Howard learned of the reason, they left Healy to form their own act, which quickly took off with a tour of the theater circuit. Healy attempted to stop the new act with legal action, claiming they were using his copyrighted material. There are accounts of Healy threatening to bomb theaters if Howard, Fine and Howard ever performed there, which worried Shemp so much that he almost left the act; reportedly, only a pay raise kept him on board. Healy tried to save his act by hiring replacement stooges, but they were inexperienced and not as well-received as their predecessors. In 1932, with Moe now acting as business manager, Healy reached a new agreement with his former Stooges, and they were booked in a production of Jacob J. Shubert's The Passing Show of 1932. During rehearsals, Healy received a more lucrative offer and found a loophole in his contract allowing him to leave the production. Shemp, fed up with Healy's abrasiveness, decided to quit the act and found work almost immediately, in Vitaphone movie comedies produced in Brooklyn, New York.With Shemp gone, Healy and the two remaining stooges (Moe and Larry) needed a replacement, so Moe suggested his younger brother Jerry Howard. Healy reportedly took one look at Jerry, who had long chestnut red locks and a handlebar mustache, and remarked that he did not look like he was funny. Jerry left the room and returned a few moments later with his head shaved (though his mustache remained for a time), and then quipped "Boy, do I look girly." Healy heard "Curly", and the name stuck. (There are varying accounts as to how the Curly character actually came about.)In 1933, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) signed Healy and his Stooges to a movie contract. They appeared in feature films and short subjects, either together, individually, or with various combinations of actors. The trio was featured in a series of musical comedy shorts, beginning with Nertsery Rhymes. The short was one of a few shorts to be made with an early two-strip Technicolor process, including one featuring Curly without Healy or the other Stooges, Roast Beef and Movies (1934). The shorts themselves were built around recycled film footage of production numbers cut from MGM musicals, such as Children of Pleasure, Lord Byron of Broadway, and the unfinished March of Time (all 1930), which had been filmed in early Technicolor. Soon, additional shorts followed (sans the experimental Technicolor), including Beer and Pretzels (1933), Plane Nuts (1933), Jail Birds of Paradise (1934) and The Big Idea (1934).Healy and company also appeared in several MGM feature films as comic relief, such as Turn Back the Clock (1933), Meet the Baron (1933), Dancing Lady (1933), Fugitive Lovers (1934), and Hollywood Party (1934). Healy and the Stooges also appeared together in Myrt and Marge for Universal Pictures.In 1934, the team's contract with MGM expired, and the Stooges parted professional company with Healy. According to Moe Howard's autobiography, the Stooges split with Ted Healy in 1934 once and for all because of Healy's alcoholism and abrasiveness. Their final film with Healy was MGM's 1934 film, Hollywood Party. Both Healy and the Stooges went on to separate successes, with Healy dying under mysterious circumstances in 1937.In 1934, the trio– now officially named "The Three Stooges"– signed on to appear in two-reel comedy short subjects for Columbia Pictures. In Moe's autobiography, he said they each got $600 per week on a one-year contract with a renewable option; in the Ted Okuda–Edward Watz book The Columbia Comedy Shorts, the Stooges are said to have received $1,000 among them for their first Columbia effort, Woman Haters, and then signed a term contract for $7,500 per film (equal to $132,220 today), to be divided among the trio.Within their first year at Columbia, the Stooges became wildly popular. Realizing this, Columbia Pictures president Harry Cohn used the Stooges as leverage, as the demand for their films was so great that he eventually refused to supply exhibitors with the trio's shorts unless they also agreed to book some of the studio's mediocre B movies. Cohn also saw to it that the Stooges remained ignorant of their popularity. During their 23 years at Columbia, the Stooges were never completely aware of their amazing drawing power at the box office. As their contracts with the studio included an open option that had to be renewed yearl
Other Products from backlotmovie:View all products
ASIAN Woman ORIGINAL Wardrobe FASHION Photo CHINESE Asia 1950's Chinese
$4.99
TOMORROW IS FOREVER Poster CLAUDETTE COLBERT Film Noir Orson Welles VINTAGE 1946
$59.99
ANDERSONVILLE Program JARROD EMICK Frederic Forrest TNT
$8.99
HANSEL and GRETEL puppet OPERA Original RKO Photo 1954
$5.99
DUSTIN HOFFMAN Color Photo  POSTER Magazine SPAIN 1970s
$6.99
TIME BANDITS Original 1-SHEET Movie POSTER Sean Connery
$19.99
MEATBALLS Original 1-Sheet POSTER Camp '79 BILL MURRAY
$64.99
BORN YESTERDAY Original 1-Sheet JUDY HOLLIDAY Movie POSTER William Holden OSCAR!
$74.99
FARRAH FAWCETT Original JAPAN Scuba POSTER CHARLIE'S ANGELS Olivia Newton John
$99.99
BASIL RATHBONE French Fantasy  MAGIC SWORD Poster ESTELLE WINWOOD
$6.99
Last Updated: 14 Oct 2017 10:17:31 PDT home  |  about  |  terms  |  contact
Powered by eCRATER - a free online store builder